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Home » Green news

A new way to shop?

Submitted by on Tuesday, 31 July 2012 Loading Add to favourites  2 Comments

I love to reduce my carbon footprint, but I’m also slowly starting to embrace the delights of modern technology.

I have an iPad and Little Miss Green has an iPod, while Mr Green favours his smartphone – these are all our ‘entertainment’ gadgets, instead of having a TV.

Of course there is more to life than sitting behind a screen and there are probably numerous more ‘green’ ways to spend my time, but my old teenage habits of numbing my brain after a hard day still sits with me and I find browsing around the internet a way of unwinding.

Many companies now have mobile platforms to account for the number of their users making the most of mobile technology and now one of my favourite ethical clothing companies have launched their brand new mobile platform.

BAM was the first brand in Europe to start offering bamboo clothing back in 2006. Determined to make a difference in the world; for every received order the company plants a tree in the name of the purchaser. It’s a win-win isn’t it? You get nice new clothes, support an ethical business AND help the planet a little.

Bamboo is the ideal all-year round fabric as its moisture wicking AND is naturally anti-bacterial. I must admit, even though it’s been really hot recently, I’ve not found any nasty niffs when wearing the vest; it seems to keep smells at bay – naturally! And I don’t know if you’ve ever touched bamboo clothing, but it is unbelievably soft and comfortable, yet it’s hard wearing.

I’ve recently been sent one of their women’s vests; it’s in the most amazing colour; an aqua green that is perfect for our long-awaited British Summer. What I love about this is its length! Most vests only just reach my waistline as I have a pretty long back, but this one comes to my hips which keeps the bottom of my back warm. Even in the height of summer my Grandmother’s warning of keeping my kidneys warm rings through my ears!

I’ve tried their new mobile platform on my iPad and I have to say it’s so seamless you don’t even know it’s a mobile site. Many other sites break or can’t load properly on a mobile device, but BAM in conjunction with MoPowered have got it just right.

What about you? Do you use a mobile gadget to browse the internet?

Disclosure: I was sent one ladies vest (which Little Miss Green and I are currently fighting over) in exchange for writing this review.

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2 Comments »

  • chris levey says:

    I wonder if Bamboo is that eco friendly as a lot of chemicals are used in the processing, bamboo is just another name for Rayon. see http://jorgandolif.com/consume/bamboo-hoo-ha-the-great-green-hope-not-so-green-after-all/ for more info.None organic cotton is also grown using a lot of pesticieds.Wool is probably the most green textile but it makes me itch.As usual the answer to each eco question I ask just gives me more questions.

  • Jane says:

    Sadly, these things are never clear cut. I agree that wool is one of the most green fabrics, but, as Chris says, it may be itchy, and I am also not sure that I really want woollen summer dresses. I believe that hemp may be a very green fabric, but I do not think this is a very good fabric either. Polyester made from recycled plastic is said to be green, although it is made from man-made chemicals and I believe that a lot of water is used in processing. I think that the greenest option is to make use of fabric already in existence, by wearing garments for as long as possible (mending them where necessary) and, when they wear out, making something new out of any salvagable bits of fabric. Also, my grandmother used to unravel old jumpers and knit something new out of the wool.