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Home » Ethical Consumerism

@nomadsclothing help us buy both fair trade and organic clothing!

Submitted by on Wednesday, 3 December 2014 Loading Add to favourites  No Comment

nomads fair trade clothing organic shirtAs I’ve mentioned before, I find this time of year a bit of a struggle.

I have well meaning family members asking me what I want for Christmas.

And I know I’m not that easy to buy for.

I have certain requirements that tie in with my chosen green and ethical lifestyle, along with a few health preferences so buying me a box of chocolates is fraught with problems – because I don’t eat refined sugar and I don’t want some kid trafficked just so I can get a momentary taste sensation! (btw, you can click here to find Traffik-free chocolate in the UK)

Flowers with 3000 air miles that have cost farmers their health don’t quite hit the mark, don’t exactly say ‘I love you’ to me.

I’m chemically sensitive so a bottle of perfume has to be bought from a limited number of manufacturers.

Diamonds and silk? Well as long as they’re conflict free and you’re talking about peace silk we might be getting somewhere…

I like practical presents – something I can use or something that will enhance my life and then that all sounds boring to the person I’m asking to buy for me. Ya know, who wants to buy you a compost bin?

But clothes? Now you’re talking!

Yes, I might be a green goddess but I’m also a thoroughly modern girlie gal – and, if you’ll forgive the stereotyping, I love nothing more than clothes and shoes!

Fortunately there are more and more brands that tick the boxes when it comes to keeping a clean and green conscience.

One of my favourites is Nomads clothing. I’ve been buying their clothes for years; ever since I came across one of their lovely tops in a charity shop!

Nomads go back a long way. They’ve been trading since the days when I was wearing a yellow tube skirt, had a back-combed perm and wore white stilettos – which means they’ve stood the test of time and have built up a loyal following where others have failed.

One of the reasons I’m a huge fan of Nomads is that you don’t have to choose between FairTrade or organic – you can have them both!

All of Nomads products are produced in line with fair trade policies and they are a member of BAFTS. Set up in 1995, BAFTS help you sort the greenwashers from the genuine independent fair trade shops across the UK. Their main aim is to promote fair trade retailing and raise the profile of fair trade on the High Street across the UK. They promote fair trade events such as World Fair Trade Day and provide links to other fair trade organisations.

According to the FairTrade Foundation, Fairtrade is about better prices, decent working conditions, local sustainability, and fair terms of trade for people in the developing world; which is a 180 degree u-turn on conventional trade discriminating against the poorest, weakest producers. And it means you can use your power to vote with your money and make a difference in people’s lives.

But it doesn’t stop there.

Cotton has the second largest agricultural use of pesticides in the world and five out of the top nine pesticides used on cotton are classified as cancer causing. Fortunately for me, Nomads have a growing range of organic cotton products too.

There are many benefits to purchasing organic cotton clothing including:

  • Organic farming emits about half the amount of CO2 produced by chemical methods, so you’re reducing your carbon footprint.
  • Organic cotton farming uses up to 60% less water than conventional farming methods; you’re helping preserve one of the worlds most precious resources.
  • Conventional cotton is often GM – if you’re concerned about eating GM this is something to take into consideration.
  • More workers are required to harvest the organic crop, so it provides more jobs.
  • Reducing the use of chemicals and pesticides means a healthier work environment for the farmers and a cleaner conscience for you!
  • You’re not wearing pesticides against your skin!

Check out these pics from the current Organic Clothing range from Nomads:

nomads organic clothing top

nomads organic cotton dress

organic cotton dress nomads clothing

organic cotton top nomads clothing

What about you – you might eat organic food, but have you thought about organic clothes?

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