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Home » Ethical Consumerism, Green news

Organic, British flowers from Ochre and Ochre

Submitted by on Wednesday, 3 June 2009 Loading Add to favourites  No Comment

ochre-and-ochre-organic-flowersI love cut flowers, but I stopped buying them a couple of years ago after being concerned about air miles, child labour and toxic pesticides.

Fortunately, Ochre and Ochre have come up trumps with a unique collection of organic, traditional British flower bouquets.

Ethically minded

They have two beautiful designs to choose from; a pair of posies, designed to compliment ochre & ochre’s organic textiles; and my favourite, the hand-tied country bouquet.

As you might remember from my last post about Ochre and Ochre, Fiona and Tess choose small, ethically minded suppliers to help minimise their impact on the environment and support the local economy.

Organically grown

For these beautiful flowers, Ochre and Ochre have teamed up with Charlie Ryrie, a well-established garden writer and gardener. Charlie grows organic, seasonal flowers near the River Wye, on the Welsh Borders.

Go into any supermarket to buy cut flowers and you’ll find bouquet upon bouquet of identical-looking flowers. If you want something truly unique, Ochre and Ochre’s bouquets alter depending on the season and the weather. That’s the beauty of buying a truly natural product!

Seasonal bouquets

Just as eating seasonally does not involve strawberries in December or parsnips in June, buying naturally grown, local flowers means you can say good bye to lilies in March, or dahlias in May. Instead you will get beautiful, sustainable and often unusual seasonal varieties in glorious combinations which look chic and are unique.

The most disappointing thing I find about mass-grown flowers is the lack of scent. Ochre and Ochre’s British, organic flowers are a treat for your nose as well as your eyes, as many blooms are chosen specifically for their scent.

Zero waste packaging

As you know, packaging is my thing! You can rest assured that each bouquet is packaged in cardboard boxes and wrapped in biodegradable cellophane and recycled kraft paper for a true zero waste gift.

Bouquets can be ordered online from Ochre and Ochre and cost £30.

What about you – Have you bought local flowers? How did they compare to supermarket or other florists?

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